DECREASE INFLAMMATION

Want to decrease inflammation naturally
throughout your body?

It’s totally possible
with a sugar-free diet.

COUNT ME IN!

BALLOONING OUT?

When we eat excessive sugars, our body can become inflamed. Inflammation, which is part of our body’s immune system response, is a reaction to protect the body from injury or intruders. If we eat high levels of free sugars and refined carbs over time, our body responds via chronic inflammation, so every time we eat a high-sugar meal—our body attempts to rid itself of the injurious substances.

In experimental studies, sugars (specifically fructose) have been shown to induce inflammation in blood vessels leading to the heart1. Even in healthy individuals, prolonged high levels of insulin caused by consuming free sugars and highly processed starches, has been shown to increase inflammation in the body.2 And inflammation in the body can also trigger depression.3 By reducing or eliminating free sugars in your diet, you’ll be able to reduce inflammation throughout your body’s cells and tissues,4 and ward off unsavory diseases.

UP YOUR MAGNESIUM!

According to studies, lowering your free sugars and upping your magnesium intake in your diet can decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in the body.5, 6, 7, 8 Magnesium is also vital in the control of blood sugar and glucose metabolism. Foods particularly high in magnesium and on the SugarDetoxMe Top 200 List include spinach, Swiss chard, beet greens, turnip greens, summer squash, beans, like navy, black, pinto and kidney; tempeh (fermented soybeans), pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, flax seeds, and herbs like basil and parsley. Let’s cast off our sweet tooth and eat well to get healthy!


REFERENCES

1. Glushakova, O, et al. 2008-Apr-1. Fructose Induces the Inflammatory Molecule ICAM-1 in Endothelial Cells. AJournal of American Society of Nephrology. 19 (9) 1712-1720. Retrieved from here.

2. Aeberlie, I, et al. 2011 Aug. Low to moderate sugar-sweetened beverage consumption impairs glucose and lipid metabolism and promotes inflammation in healthy young men: a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 94 (2): 479-485. Retrieved from here.

3. Shelton, R.C. and A.H. Miller, et al. 2010 Aug. Eating ourselves to death (and despair): The contribution of adiposity and inflammation to depression. Progress in Neurobiology. 91 (4): 275-299. Retrieved from here.

4. Brymora, A., et al. 2011-May-25. Low-fructose diet lowers blood pressure and inflammation in patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephrol. Dial. Transplant. 27 (2): 608-612. Retrieved from here.

5. Glushakova, O, et al. 2008-Apr-1. Fructose Induces the Inflammatory Molecule ICAM-1 in Endothelial Cells. AJournal of American Society of Nephrology. 19 (9) 1712-1720. Retrieved from here.

6.Malpuech-Brugère, C., et al. 2000-Jun-15. Inflammatory response following acute magnesium deficiency in the rat. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Molecular Basis of Disease. 1501 (2-3): 91-98. Retrieved from here.

7. Weglicki, W.B. and T. M. Phillips. 1992 Sept. Pathobiology of magnesium deficiency: a cytokine/neurogenic inflammation hypothesis. American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 263 (3): R734-R737. Retrieved from here.

8. Maier, J.A.M., et al. 2004-May-24. Low magnesium promotes endothelial cell dysfunction: implications for atherosclerosis, inflammation and thrombosis. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – Molecular Basis of Disease. 1689 (1): 13–21. Retrieved from here.